SÃO PAULO | ZÜRICH

 
SÃO PAULO | ZÜRICH

Felipe Góes

Felipe Góes
Rafael Kamada

Felipe Góes
Cataclysm

09 Aug – 06 Sep 2019

Opening
08 Aug, 19h–22h


Kogan Amaro Gallery
Alameda Franca, 1054
Jardim Paulista, São Paulo, SP

Felipe Góes

Cataclysm

At the beginning, there was only disorder. The only god was Chaos, which reigned the nothingness, alone. So it then decides to create Gaia, earth-mother and the primeval force of the universe. This is how the origin of the world starts in Greek mythology, from where the cataclysm appears and the transformation rules. Surreal landscapes, where lava and water coexist and get mixed, inhabit our imagination and also the paintings by plastic artist Felipe Góes.

An oneiric dusk brings together the works of the 36-year-old artist from Sao Paulo, all composed of intense strokes that go between William Turner and Gerhard Richter, sometimes made with acrylic paint, sometimes with gouache. “For almost one year I have been taking my work to this imaginary place, in a constant process of renewal, that goes from the shapes to the palette, to the sizes of the works, that are gaining more and more body”, he explains.

If before he followed fields of color to bring pace to his work – a process that we recognize in the works of artists like Paulo Pasta (whose study group Góes attended between 2008 and 2012) –, now, he intertwines these shades, leaving these areas more mingled and diffuse. “This recent transformation coincides with the most intense period of interlocution with artist Rubens Espírito Santo,” he says.

The figurative is another element that grew in the artist’s output. Connected to a certain expressionism in the stroke, he changed the incidence of light and shadow in his paintings. These characteristics make Góes be a part of a new generation of abstract-figurative painters that have succeeded in the art scene, composed by names such as Daniel Lannes, Marina Rheingantz, Bruno Dunley and Rodrigo Bivar. “If some artists paint from the photo of a landscape, and others from the memory that they have of this place, I put myself in a third circle, mixing memories from various destinations. With this, I create a partially unreal location.”

Lush nature permeates these records, like a kind of catalogue of nonexistent places – all covered by the magical penumbra of the colors of the sunrise and the sunset. Some of them suggest the human presence, either in a lighthouse, on a bridge or some undefined construction. A way of making our existence in this world of cataclysms possible.


Ana Carolina Ralston