SÃO PAULO | ZÜRICH

 
SÃO PAULO | ZÜRICH

ArtRio Online 2020

ArtRio Online 2020
Rafael Kamada

ArtRio Online 2020

We are pleased to announce our participation in ArtRio Online 2020. The fair will be available virtually from the 15th to the 25th of October. The Gallery presents the project “Nosso resto de real”, curated by Pollyana Quintella, bringing works by the following artists: Alan Fontes | Bruno Miguel | Felipe Góes | Gabriel Botta | Mirela Cabral | Samuel de Saboia | Tangerina Bruno.

Our Reality Remnant

It’s hardly news that our time is marked by the profusion and technical efficiency of images. On the internet, they share tabs, webs, apps, selfies, virtual selves, WhatsApp stickers. In the streets, they’re packages, pieces of advertisement, billboards and prints. At home, they’re photographs, paintings, book covers, souvenirs and memorabilia. We’re surrounded by them in everything we do.

But although the unavoidable presence of images has opened up numerous possibilities of subjectivity expression, representation, and invention, we’ve also become more and more their hostages. The cloud stores our nudes, the app recognizes our faces, the security camera records the felony, the webcam is on 24 hours a day, Instagram is an addiction. Besides, it’s not unusual to find ourselves with no tools to distinguish fiction from reality, truth from lie, publicity from real life. Images control us and no information seems to escape. We are, therefore, facing a dilemma.

The works here gathered by seven artists represented by Galeria Kogan Amaro respond to this issue in different ways. They all deal with the realm of imagery, this reality remnant, whether by referring more directly to the daily image repertoire (newspaper pictures, consumerism symbols, cartoons), or by creating original images that design different and new worlds and narrate upcoming prospects. We go through Alan Fontes’ disasters, Gabriel Botta’s explosions, Felipe Góes’ invented landscapes, Mirela Cabral’s pictorial embroidery, Bruno Miguel’s pop irony, and the delirious scenes by the Tangerina Bruno duo as well as Samuel de Saboia’s Afrocentric imagery.

Through them, we practice reactions to these imperative and persistent questions: why is it that our time, marked by this image overload, is also the time of a crisis in imagination? What is, after all, an image? What’s behind imagery construction, its logistics, its operating system? If the overload of images has kept our eyes permanently open, making vision an uninterrupted action, we learn from the artists that in order to dream we also need to close our eyes. We shall then establish a new measurement scale for blinking, a new alternation of open and closed eyes, as suggested by Didi-Huberman.

Pollyana Quintella